When to Play Injured? When to Sit? NBA Playoffs 2019.

With basketball fever in full force in the GTA, there are even more people out playing pickup or just shooting around! Outdoor play and unorganized play is an amazing way to interact with peers or family, and get some exercise.

In our Oakville Physio, Massage, Chiropody and Yoga Therapy clinic we see basketball related injuries from weekend warriors, pick-up players to competitive rep players.

Over the NBA season people have a vested interest in injuries that are happening so they can modify their fantasy basketball teams accordingly. Over the NBA finals with the Toronto Raptors and the Golden State Warriors, we pay close attention when athlete is taken out of play.

Will they play in the upcoming games?

Will they be playing at their best?

When I was a University student, the team sponsorship changed, and the athletes changed their shoes over to the ones provided. Soon after, the athletes of the women’s and men’s team had a suspicious increase in the rate of shin splints.

Golden State Warrior Klay Thompson didn’t play in game 3 of the NBA finals due to injury and his team being cautious. He was complaining about a sore hamstring in game 2. The decision to play an athlete with an injury like that is difficult.

Will intense play make it worse?

Would he be able to play at his regular level?

Is it better to rest an athlete and then have them better in the future?

It can be challenging to rehab injuries when you’re involved in competitive sports because the season moves on without you. It’s a delicate dance to ensuring play is at a sufficient level where an injury will not be worsened to a point of possibly putting your future season at risk also. When at the end of the season, in payoff or a final game or competitive action is it worth it to give it a go? Think Kerri Strug and her fine vault in the Atlanta Olympics in 1996. That final push was successful, and theoretically the risks for her were worth the benefits.

It should be a discussion with the athlete, coach and medical staff. The athlete should be tested in exercises and drills that replicate game play at a progressive level. A Physiotherapist may suggest certain supportive taping or compressive techniques. The Physio or RMT may also provide some hands on treatment techniques for pain relief.

Massage of the legs showing Oakville RMT