Category Archives: General

The Healing Touch: The Role of Physiotherapy in Sports Injury Management

February 22 marks the “Recreational Sports & Fitness Day” day, dedicated to promoting physical activity, health, and wellness through recreational sports and fitness activities. This day encourages people of all ages to engage in sports and fitness-related activities for fun, enjoyment, and the overall well-being of individuals. When it comes to sports injuries, physiotherapy plays a crucial role in both treatment and prevention. Here’s a detailed look at the effects of physiotherapy treatment on sports injuries:

What’s Physiotherapy All About?

Physiotherapy is like a superhero for sports injuries. It doesn’t just treat the pain – it looks at everything, from your body to your mind. First, physiotherapists check out your injury to understand what’s going on. Then, they develop a custom treatment plan tailored just for you. Employing a diverse range of modalities such as manual therapy, ultrasound therapy, and therapeutic exercises, physiotherapists aim to alleviate pain, restore function, promote tissue healing, and prevention of future occurrences.

Sports injuries encompass a wide range of conditions, from acute strains and sprains to chronic overuse injuries. Common sports injuries include:

  • Sprains and Strains: These occur when ligaments (sprains) or muscles/tendons (strains) are stretched or torn, often due to sudden movements or overexertion.
  • Fractures: Sports-related fractures can occur from direct trauma or repetitive stress, leading to a break or crack in the bone.
  • Tendonitis: Inflammation of tendons caused by repetitive motions, often resulting in pain, swelling, and decreased range of motion.
  • Dislocations: Dislocations happen when the bones in a joint are forced out of their normal position, usually due to a sudden impact or collision.
  • Concussions: Head injuries are caused by a blow to the head, usually resulting in a temporary disruption of brain function, with symptoms such as headache, dizziness, and confusion

Navigating the Path to Recovery:

Physiotherapy involves a systematic approach to sports injury management, comprising assessment, pain management, restoration of mobility and function, rehabilitation exercises, manual therapy, education and prevention, and a progressive return to activity.

  • Assessment entails evaluating the injury, considering medical history and diagnostic imaging for a comprehensive understanding.
  • Pain management employs modalities like ice/heat therapy and manual techniques to alleviate discomfort and inflammation.
  • Restoration of mobility and function is achieved through targeted exercises and stretching to regain range of motion and strength. Rehabilitation exercises are customized to enhance strength, stability, and proprioception, minimizing the risk of future injuries.
  • Manual therapy techniques like massage and joint mobilization aid in tissue mobility and healing.
  • Education and prevention focus on teaching proper body mechanics and warm-up techniques to prevent re-injury.
  • Progressive return to activity ensures a safe transition back to sports-specific movements as the individual’s rehabilitation progresses.

If you’re grappling with a sports injury, our skilled team of physiotherapists is here to support your journey back to your peak performance. We understand the frustration and limitations that come with sports injuries, but with our expertise and personalized care, you can overcome these obstacles.

Contact us!

Take the first step towards recovery by contacting us today or using our online booking system to schedule your initial physiotherapy assessment and treatment.

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Growing Pains in Children – Should You See a Physiotherapist?

School has officially begun for the year and with that comes an increase in activity levels for many children. As the fall and winter season approaches, many kids will participate in school sports as well as extra-curricular organized sports and activities. This ramp-up in exercise levels can sometimes lead to aches and pains, particularly in young children who are still growing at fast rates.

The term “growing pains” refers to this sort of injury. This pain is muscular in nature and occurs because bones are growing and changing at a faster rate than the muscles can keep up, which puts added stress and tension on the muscles. This can be more prevalent in children who participate in sports all year long, or children who play multiple sports at the same time.

Common Growing Pains

  • Sever’s Disease: pain in the back of the heel where the Achilles tendon attaches.
  • Shin Splints: pain in and around the shins.
  • Osgood Schlatter’s Disease: pain below the knee from the quadriceps muscle pulling on the shin bone.

Symptoms of Growing Pains

  • Pain in the thighs, knees, shins, or ankles.
  • Pain after playing sports or engaging in activity.
  • Pain at night when sleeping.
  • Pain is described as an “ache” or “burning.”

Physiotherapy and Growing Pains

Physiotherapist Nada demonstrating stretches that can be relieving for Severs Disease

Physiotherapy treatment is a very effective way to treat and manage activity-related pains in growing children. The aim is to reduce inflammation and improve muscle flexibility and strength. This includes techniques like mobilizations, manual stretching, and soft tissue work. The physiotherapist can also instruct you on how to manage your symptoms at home and what exercises to do to effectively target the area.

If your child is experiencing pain and discomfort with exercise, book an initial assessment here with one of our physiotherapists. They will design a treatment program individually tailored to your child’s needs, age, and activity level.

What Happens When You Have A Body Part That Is Immobilized?

Maybe you are healing from a fractured wrist and have it in a cast.

Maybe you are recovering from knee surgery and have a brace on.

Maybe you have a torn Achilles and have a boot on.

Maybe you dislocated your shoulder and have it in a sling.

Or maybe you had to be on bedrest for a significant length of time due to other health issues.

The point is… you as a whole, or a certain body part, were immobilized.

Interestingly, when you get referred to physio after the brace or cast or sling come off, we are not really treating the original injury at that point. We are treating the secondary effects of it, along with the effects from the immobilization!

So What Are Those Secondary Effects?

When you’ve had a fracture, or a dislocation, or a ligament / tendon / muscle tear, what you can expect is:

  • Decreased range of motion
  • Decreased strength
  • Pain with use
  • Swelling
  • Overall lack of function i.e. you’re not able to do all the things you were doing before the injury
Physiotherapist Kristina working on range of motion with a patient post knee surgery

Similarly, when a body part is immobilized, these issues get compounded.

Let’s take a fractured ankle for example. Maybe it didn’t need surgery but you were still put in a cast or a splint for 4-8 weeks:

  • When the muscles of that ankle and foot aren’t been used for that length of time, they begin to atrophy – you lose muscle mass and therefore, muscle strength. Your body has a strict “use it or lose it” policy and it’s not going to put in energy into maintaining something that’s not being used. Not to mention, it now has to redirect energy and resources into healing the fracture.
  • Without movement in the ankle joint, the joint gets stiffer and the muscles around it get tighter. Not to mention the swelling that’s been pooling will also block additional movement. Which means, the range of motion and flexibility of your ankle once the cast or splint come off, will be very minimal and likely have some pain.
  • Along with trying to move it, putting weight on it will likely also cause the ankle some pain. Part of that is due to the muscle weakness, swelling, and decreased range of motion. The presence of these adds to the pain of an area that’s already recovering from injury and is still sensitive.
  • And as you can imagine… if you have limited range of motion, muscle weakness, and pain… your walking, standing, and balance will be affected. Not to mention your ability to do things that require more exertion such as climbing stairs, squatting, lifting heavy objects, running, jumping, dancing, etc.
  • Lastly, let’s not forget about the rest of you! If you’ve had a fractured ankle, you aren’t using the whole leg very much either, so all of those muscles will be a bit weaker. On the contrary, the other leg might be tired from overcompensating, and maybe even getting a bit sore. Plus, you’re less active than you were before the injury, so you might also lose some cardiovascular fitness.

Cue Physiotherapy! We are here to gradually get you back on track with all of the above and as much as possible back to normal!

Depending on the injury, we follow protocols for restoring range of motion and strength, as well as reintroducing day-to-day, work, or recreational activities back into your routine.

Oh, and what about when you’ve had to be on bedrest?

Although no specific body part was immobilized, depending on how long bedrest was necessary for, there will likely be some general muscle atrophy.

Physiotherapist Kristina explaining how the patient can work on secondary effects from recent knee surgery

It’s due to the same “use it or lose it” principle.

And it’s not just your muscles… Other impacts of prolonged bedrest include:

  • Backache from the atrophy of core and postural muscles
  • An overall decrease of cardiovascular fitness and respiratory system efficiency
  • This leads to less energy and more fatigue once you start moving and trying to be more active
  • Increased risk of falls due to weakness and decreased balance
  • Increased risk for fracture because bones also get weaker without weight-bearing activities (i.e. walking). Just like muscle mass is maintained with use, bone strength is maintained with use.
  • Tendons and ligaments also lose some of their natural properties that allow them to do their jobs effectively. As a result, when you start being more active following bedrest or immobilization, they are now more prone to injury.

You may experience some of these effects in as little as 3-5 days of bedrest.

The good news is, bedrest is not prescribed as often as it used to be. That’s because research has shown that in most cases, there are minimal to no benefits. We are now also much more aware of the detriments it can cause.

However, when it is necessary, depending how long you were on bedrest for, it might be worth doing a few physio sessions to get you back into activity safely. Book here for an assessment today!

What is a Concussion and How Can Physio Help?

A concussion is a traumatic brain injury. It can be caused by:

  • a blow to the head
  • impact from a fall
  • a sudden acceleration of the head and upper body (e.g., as your head and neck whip forward during a car accident). KEY NOTE – This means you don’t need actual head impact to have a brain injury! This is because the brain can still be injured by the impact against the walls of the skull.

Diagnosing a Concussion…

Signs (observable by others):

  • appears dazed and delayed in answering questions.
  • Easily confused, appears foggy.
  • Slow to respond, slow reaction times.
  • forgetful, no memory of the events prior to or immediately after the injury (usually short-term memory loss).
  • mood/behavior/personality changes (usually presenting as irritability and/or depression).
  • Loss of consciousness (rare).

Symptoms (reported by the patient):

  • Headache or “pressure” in the head
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • light sensitivity
  • noise sensitivity
  • Feeling foggy or in a daze
  • Concentration or memory difficulties
  • difficulty reading
  • unusual fatigue
  • disrupted sleep
  • low mood
  • Difficulty with balance/dizziness
  • Double or blurry vision
  • ringing in the ear
  • screen intolerance
Physiotherapists Testing For Balance and Vision Issues.

Signs and symptoms might not be immediately apparent. They may appear hours or days after the injury. Therefore, it’s important to keep checking in after a hit, fall, or whiplash-type injury for the rest of the week.

Sometimes, there can be more serious signs and symptoms indicative of a brain bleed that leads to a hematoma (a dangerous collection of blood that causes swelling in the area and compresses the rest of the brain).

When to call 911 / go to the ER:

  • One pupil is larger than the other.
  • Extreme drowsiness or not waking up.
  • A worsening headache
  • slurred speech, weakness, numbness, worsening coordination
  • continued vomiting.
  • seizures
  • loss of consciousness

Note – in infants and toddlers, any of the above signs, inconsolable crying, or continued refusal to feed should all be considered a red flag.

Timeline

Most concussion signs and symptoms resolve within two weeks. It is still normal to have lingering effects for up to 3 months.

However, it is always a good idea to get the concussion checked out by a medical professional (e.g., a family doctor) within the first week.

Do not wait to see if it will resolve before consulting your doctor. Concussions ARE brain injuries, and they can have long-lasting residual effects that affect your daily living.

What helps the healing process?

  • Get more rest than usual.
  • Pace your activities (e.g., break down into smaller chunks, take microbreaks, stop when symptoms increase).
  • hydrate more often.
  • Eat more whole foods and focus on food high in omega 3s and 6s.

Why you should see a Physio

Now that we’ve covered what a concussion is and its effects, let’s talk about why Physiotherapy can be an appropriate treatment.

Physio treatment involves:

  • Manual therapy (soft tissue and joint mobilizations).
  • Exercise therapy (range of motion, strength, stretch, cardio, balance, vision exercises).
  • education (on the recovery process, self-management strategies, relaxation techniques especially for improving sleep hygiene, return to work/sport/school).
Physiotherapist Kirsten Providing Manual Therapy on a Patients Neck.
An Example of Exercise Therapy to Work on Balance for a Concussion Patient.

A combination of these can help with post-concussive symptoms such as:

  • fatigue
  • Double or blurry vision
  • balance impairments
  • dizziness
  • neck pain                                                                                                                                            
  • headaches
  • low tolerance for activity (e.g. school, screentime, sports)

Return to activity.

Rest is recommended for the first 24-48 hours with very limited screen time and no exercise. After the first 48 hours, depending on the severity of symptoms, general activity and screen time should be gradually introduced, increasing them based on the level of symptom aggravation (typically mild to moderate symptoms are normal, while moderate to high symptoms indicate the need to stop the activity and wait until symptoms have settled before resuming).

This includes a return to work, whether it is a return to a desk job or a job that is more physically demanding.

Return to sport.

The table below is taken from the Zurich 2012 conference CONSENSUS STATEMENT: McCrory, Paul, et al. “Consensus statement on concussion in sport: the 4th International Conference on Concussion in Sport held in Zurich, November 2012.

GRADUATED RETURN TO PLAY PROTOCOL
Rehabilitation StageFunctional exercise at each stage of rehabilitationObjective of each stage
1. No activitySymptom limited physical and cognitive restRecovery
2. Light aerobic exerciseWalking, swimming, or stationary cycling keeping intensity <70% maximum permitted heart rate. No resistance trainingIncrease HR
3. Sport-specific exerciseSkating drills in ice hockey, running drills in soccer. No head impact activitiesAdd movement
4. Non-contact training drillsProgression to more complex training drills, e.g. passing drills in football and ice hockey. May start progressive resistance trainingExercise, coordination, and cognitive load
5. Full-contact practiceFollowing medical clearance participate in normal training exerciseRestore confidence and assess functional skills by coaching staff
6. Return to playNormal game play

Contact us to learn more or book an initial assessment here to get started with your therapy today!

“It’s Just A Sprain” – The Importance Of Physio For Ankle Sprains

An ankle sprain is a common musculoskeletal injury caused by a tear or damage to one of the ligaments surrounding the ankle joint. It is frequently the outcome of an event, such as a sports contact, a trip, or a misstep while walking. It can affect people of all ages and athletic abilities.

Ankle sprain symptoms can vary greatly in terms of the degree of pain, limitation of movement, and swelling present. These are usually determined by the location and severity of the sprain.

Physiotherapist Nada Testing For Mobility

However, regardless of the severity of your symptoms, if you suspect you have hurt your ankle, you should consult a physiotherapist as soon as possible. Ideally, within 36-48 hours after the injury, to ensure that the pain and swelling have a chance to settle before starting.  In the meantime, at home, use the R.I.C.E. routine (rest, ice, compression, and elevation) to promote the healing process.

Physiotherapy early on can reduce the chance of additional ankle issues such as persistent pain, stiffness, lack of movement, or strength. Your physiotherapist will be able to check the severity and instability of your ankle sprain, as well as any functional limitations, and rule out anything more serious, such as a fracture.

Nada Checking Pain, Swelling, and Stiffness of The Injured Ankle

Treatment with a physiotherapist will use a combination of exercise and manual hands-on therapy to improve strength, range of motion, and proprioception of the ankle.

In the case of most ankle sprains, rest alone is unlikely to be an effective treatment method. Being proactive and obtaining treatment will not only encourage and accelerate your ankle sprain recovery time but will also maximize ankle strength and prevent re-injury in the future. A physiotherapist can educate you and design an exercise program for you to restore the function of your ankle joint and surrounding muscles.

If you believe you have sustained an ankle sprain or are experiencing ankle pain, book an assessment with one of our qualified physiotherapists here!

Balancing the Body’s Harmony: The Ancient Art and Modern Science of Acupuncture

Acupuncture is becoming increasingly popular, yet many people remain reluctant to use it as a form of treatment. So, what exactly is it, and how can it help you? We answer these and more below!

What Is Acupuncture?

Acupuncture is a therapeutic technique of inserting fine, one-time-use pre-sterilized needles into very specific points along the body to assist in pain management and healing of injuries. Patients often ask us if acupuncture is painful. The needles used for acupuncture therapy are extremely fine – patients likely feel a small poke but once the needle is inserted, most patients do not feel much pain.

How Does It Work? – Traditional Chinese Medicine

Acupuncture was developed more than 3,000 years ago in China. In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), injuries or illnesses are believed to be the results of an imbalance of energy within the body, specifically within meridians, which are channels of energy flow throughout the body. Acupuncture is used to help restore energy balance by placing fine needles at specific points along these meridians.

How Does It Work? – The Gate Control Theory of Pain

Although acupuncture is an ancient practice in Eastern medicine, its use in Western medicine is relatively recent. Though the exact reason why it works is not totally clear, Western medicine has several different theories as to how acupuncture helps with injury recovery. One of those is the Gate Control Theory of Pain.

The Gate Control Theory of Pain outlines how pain signals reach the brain from the spinal cord. In simple terms, if the ‘gate’ is open at the level of the spinal cord, a pain signal can pass through, reaching the brain where the pain is perceived. If the ‘gate’ is closed, a pain signal cannot pass through, and therefore the brain does not perceive pain. So, using this theory, applying a non-painful stimulus when someone experiences a painful stimulus can activate the closing of the gate and decrease the pain signal to the brain. An example of this would be if someone bangs their knee against a hard surface. Usually, our first instinct is to rub the knee (a non-painful stimulus), which helps us feel less pain.

What Injuries Can Be Treated With Acupuncture

Acupuncture can help in the healing process of many muscle and joint injuries. However, it is important to note that it won’t exactly heal these injuries. For example, if a muscle is torn, acupuncture will not repair the tear. However, it can assist in the symptoms associated with the tear, primarily by decreasing pain. Acupuncture has been used to aid in the recovery of a number of injuries, such as rotator cuff tendonitis, tennis elbow, and mechanical neck and back pain.

What Are The Risks Associated With Acupuncture?

The risks associated with acupuncture treatment are relatively minimal. The most common side effect is soreness and/or bruising in the region where the needles are inserted. The risk of infection is extremely LOW since the needles are pre-sterilized and used once. Some people might feel light-headed or dizzy after acupuncture treatment, so it is important to make sure you are well-hydrated and have eaten before your treatment session. If you are pregnant or have had other medical conditions (ex., cancer, stroke, etc.), there are certain points or areas that your practitioner will avoid. This is why it is extremely important to be thorough when reporting your medical history to your practitioner.

If you would like to learn more, ask your practitioner to discuss whether it would be an appropriate option for you, or book an initial assessment with us here!

Is it Sciatica?

Chances are, if you’ve had back pain or leg pain, you’ve heard the term Sciatica.

So what is it?

Sciatica refers to an injury to or compression of the Sciatic Nerve. This is a very large nerve that originates in the lower back and runs down the back of each leg.

To give a bit of background detail… nerves innervate our whole bodies, and via electrical impulses, provide both power to the muscles and sensation to the skin. When a nerve is injured or compressed, we can experience symptoms of pain, weakness, numbness, or tingling.

Symptoms of Sciatica:

Pain that can go down the back of the leg (from the gluts, down into the back of the thigh, into the calf, and into the top or sole of the foot)

Numbness along the same area

Weakness in the leg with certain movements (e.g., does your foot get caught tripping as you walk? Are you able to walk on your toes?)

Tingling along the same area

Causes of Sciatica?

Disc bulges or herniations in the lumbar spine (the disc can press on the nerve)

Spinal stenosis (the canal through which the Sciatic nerve travels has narrowed due to arthritic changes and that can cause pressure on the nerve)

Piriformis syndrome (muscles in the glut area can get tight and compress the nerve as well)

If you are experiencing any Sciatic symptoms and they are not improving/worsening after 2-3 days, then Physiotherapy can likely help!

We do a thorough assessment to find the source of the nerve compression and provide:

Manual therapy techniques to relax tight muscles and help the nerve glide more easily

Additionally, manual therapy techniques can help take the pressure off from disc bulge or herniation and improve joint mobility

Exercise therapy to strengthen the back and core, stretch the tight musculature, and glide the nerve more freely

There are exercises we can show you that also help take the pressure off the nerve if the compression is happening in the spine

PT Kristina performing the slump test

If you’re not sure, you can always give us a call and ask one of our physiotherapists!

Other recommendations in the meantime:

Performing gentle stretches like the image above can help relieve symptoms!

Try ice or heat on your back or gluts

Speak to your primary physician regarding pain management options

Avoid exclusive backrest

If you are doing any exercises that aggravate your symptoms, STOP them temporarily

Reduce your general activity i.e. “take it easy” for the first few days

Alternate positions (sit, stand, walk) rather than doing one for a prolonged time

Do not lift anything heavy, e.g. >20 lb, especially from the floor

Do not ignore this issue for weeks because it likely WILL get worse and it will then take longer to heal…

If you would like to learn more or book your initial physiotherapy assessment along with treatment, book your appointment now.

Why Stretching is Essential for a Healthy Body


Benefits of Stretching:

Improved Flexibility: Stretching helps to increase your flexibility by lengthening your muscles and improving your range of motion. This can help prevent injuries and make everyday tasks easier to perform.

Reduced Muscle Tension: Stretching can also help to reduce muscle tension and soreness. It can improve blood flow and help to release any built-up tension in your muscles, allowing you to feel more relaxed and less stressed.

Improved Posture: Stretching can help to improve your posture by reducing any imbalances in your muscles. This can lead to a better alignment of your spine and improve your overall body mechanics.

Increased Energy: Stretching can also increase your energy levels by stimulating your body and mind. It can help to improve your circulation and oxygen flow, allowing you to feel more alert and focused.

Effective Ways to Stretch:

Dynamic Stretching: This type of stretching involves movements that take your body through a full range of motion. It is an effective way to warm up your muscles before exercise and can help to prevent injury. Examples of dynamic stretching include lunges, leg swings, and arm circles.

Static Stretching: This type of stretching involves holding a stretch for a period, typically around 30 seconds. It is an effective way to improve flexibility and reduce muscle tension. Examples of static stretching include hamstring stretches, quad stretches, and shoulder stretches.

Foam Rolling: Foam rolling is a type of self-massage that involves using a foam roller to apply pressure to your muscles. It can help to release any knots or tension in your muscles and improve your range of motion.

Yoga: Yoga is a form of exercise that involves stretching, breathing, and meditation. It can help to improve flexibility, reduce stress, and promote relaxation. There are many different types of yoga, so it’s important to find one that suits your needs and abilities.

In conclusion, stretching is essential for maintaining a healthy body. It has numerous benefits and advantages that can improve your overall health and wellbeing. By incorporating stretching into your daily routine, you can improve your flexibility, reduce muscle tension, improve your posture, and increase your energy levels. There are many effective ways to stretch, including dynamic stretching, static stretching, foam rolling, and yoga. So why not start incorporating stretching into your daily routine and experience the benefits for yourself?

If you would like to learn more or book your initial physiotherapy assessment along with treatment, please feel free to contact us.

Are You Struggling with Shoulder Pain?

One of the most common areas of injuries we see at our clinic is the shoulder. The shoulder is one of the most mobile joints of the body but as such, it’s also very complex. Though a lot of shoulder issues present similarly, there are a few differences we can take note of. Here are some of the most common injuries we are at our clinic:

Rotator Cuff Tear

The rotator cuff is a group of four muscles around the shoulder girdle that are responsible for holding your shoulder in its socket as well as its movement. Tears can occur in the rotator cuff muscles as they can in any muscle throughout the body. Rotator cuff tears can occur either through trauma, such as a fall, or through degenerative changes caused by repetitive stress on the tendons. 

Symptoms of rotator cuff tears may include:

  • Pain at night
  • Pain with reaching overhead
  • Shoulder stiffness
  • Weakness of the shoulder and the arm

Most rotator cuff injuries do not require surgical repair but are rather treated with physiotherapy. In some cases, orthopedic specialists may recommend a corticosteroid injection to help with your pain.

Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

“Impingement” of the shoulder is a general term that refers to the rotator cuff tendons being pinched in the space underneath the acromion – the point of the shoulder. This type of condition is non-traumatic. Oftentimes, it can be related to postural imbalances or anatomical factors affecting the way your shoulder sits in its socket. Patients with shoulder impingement syndromes often have pain with movement of the shoulder especially at and above shoulder level. 

Frozen Shoulder

Patients who have frozen shoulders usually start experiencing pain around their shoulder without a specific mechanism of injury and over time, start to notice significant restrictions in the movement of the shoulder especially with overhead movements. This makes it quite difficult to complete day to day activities such as washing/brushing hair, cooking and cleaning. 

Over time, patients will also experience significant weakness in their shoulders. The exact cause of frozen shoulder is not entirely understood. Many doctors may suggest a corticosteroid injection to help reduce inflammation throughout the shoulder joint. 

If you are struggling with shoulder pain our team of experienced physiotherapists are here to help and get you back to your best self. We understand that shoulder pain can be debilitating, but with the right care, you can overcome it. Don’t hesitate to reach out and take a first step towards a pain-free life.

Contact us to book your initial physiotherapy assessment + treatment or to learn more.

Don’t let your year end health benefits go to waste-Massage

The year 2022 is moving quickly as Halloween marks the last day of October.

Time does get away from us and things we have been thinking of seeking appointments for for ourselves often get put on the back burner. Most private insurance benefits end at the end of the calendar year and restart in January.

When it comes to treatment with a Physio, RMT, Chiropodist (foot specialist), and acupuncturist, people often think of seeing them when they have sudden or acute injuries, or after surgeries like knee replacements.

There are so many ways that these health care professionals can help benefit your quality of life.

Registered Massage Therapy (RMT)

Many of our patients see their massage therapists when they have tension in their neck and shoulders. They will also book RMT visits for low back pain and stiffness. Massage Therapists are so helpful with those things but they can also treat other things.

Sports Recovery / Maintenance:

Many runners, walkers, hikers, soccer players and hockey players benefit from seeing an RMT as they increase training frequency and difficulty. They find that treatment of the thighs, glutes, calves and feet help with recovery and injury prevention. People involved in weight lifting like CrossFit and HIIT training can benefit from regular recover massage on the back, chest, shoulders, forearms and quads etc.

oakville physio biking injury

Headache Management and Treatment

People who experience tension headaches and migraines keeping a regular massage schedule can help with the frequency and severity of headaches.

There are connections of muscles from our necks, shoulders and upper backs and even to our heads. Many people experience headaches when these muscles are tense, tight and sore. Having regular massage therapy can help break this cycle and keep those headaches less intense and possibly further apart.

Your RMT will also leave you with personalized advice for home care and self management for your headaches.

Help in Managing Stress

Often low back stiffness, and neck and shoulder tension has a driver behind them. Certainly last of motion and non-optimal posture on a daily basis can contribute to these issues. Booking regular massage in addition to other positive lifestyle habits can help manage these stress levels. Having set time during massage where you unplug, slow down your breath and feel your body relax into the treatment table helps downgrade your nervous system. People often comment on how they sleep better after they have had massage.

Your massage therapist may suggest a visit as well to a yoga therapist in breathing techniques, movement and meditation to help supplement your massage treatment.

Massage therapy post surgery

Post-Surgical Massage

We often move less or have compensations in our movements when we are going through recovery. Massage Therapy can help prevent pain associated with these things as well as help with recovery from the surgery as well.

At a certain stage of healing, usually ascertained by your medical specialist you will be able to have massage in the direct area of your surgery. Some people will have scar massage locally of lymphatic drainage massage to address swelling. Earlier in healing and recovery you may benefit from massage on areas further from your surgery site.

For example, after a rotator cuff repair or a shoulder stabilization surgery, you may be asked by your surgeon to keep your arm in a sling. As the shoulder will not be moving it may be helpful to have massage around the shoulder blade and neck area, as well as the hand and forearm. Your massage therapist will make adjustments to your positioning and may even have you in sitting for some of the massage. As you progress through rehabilitation and start strengthening exercises having massage therapy as part of your recovery will be beneficial. Post total knee replacement surgery and total hip replacement surgery Massage would have the same benefits.

Massage can also be helpful after surgeries that may not be “orthopaedic” in nature. They can help with stress management, with pain and stiffness of the body, with swelling and lymphatic drainage as well as around the scar tissue. If you are unsure of how an RMT may address your particular needs after a surgery contact us at our North Oakville clinic or an RMT that is local to you.

Progressive Health Issues or During Treatment

Having massage can help with issues that present from progressive health issues like Parkinson’s disease and MS or during treatment of things like cancers. Whether it be stiffness or pain your massage therapist will work with your particular needs.

Pediatric Massage

Children should be covered under the benefits of their parents. Many kids complain of growing pains that can be associated with their knees, feet and heels. Massage Therapists often work with physiotherapists in treatment of Sever’s Disease and Osgoode Schlatter’s, jumpers knee and plantar fasciitis.

Many children are active in more than one activity or sport and with the amount of activity during growth spurts can have aches and pains in the body. Having Physio and Massage Appointments to work on these areas and have advise of home care can make sports, dance, and cheerleading seasons more pleasant and successful.

Parents are asked to be present during massage treatments.

Contact us to book your Massage Therapy appointment today. We are able to bill directly to most insurance companies. You can also use our online booking for most practitioners.